Journal Articles

Grotesque Empowerment. Belladonna’s Strapped Dykes entre mainstream et queer

Journal: Rue Descartes, no. 79, 2013/3, pp. 91-104.

Special issue: Pour une autre pornographie (edited by Laura Odello)

URL: http://www.ruedescartes.org/articles/2013-3-grotesque-empowerment-belladonna-s-strapped-dykes-entre-mainstream-et-queer/1/

Language: French

Description:
Shorter French version of the essay included in Porn After Porn: Contemporary Alternative Pornographies. This article is part of a special issue on pornography and politics of Rue Descartes, the journal of the Collège International de Philosophie (Paris). If you can read French… this special issue is really a “must read”!

Salotti e camere da letto” (written with Federico Zecca)

Journal: Quaderni del C.S.C.I., no. 9, 2013; section: Cronotopi e Figure

Special Issue: Italia, cinema di famiglie. Storia, generi, modelli (edited by Luca Malavasi)

URL: http://amigosdelcsci.blogspot.co.uk

Language: Italian

Description:
In this short piece we have made a quick survey on the ways in which the juxtaposition between the living room and the bedroom has been used in Italian cinema to embody other narrative, social and symbolic dynamics.

 

 

Review of Katrien Jacobs, People’s Pornography: Sex and Surveillance on the Chinese Internet, Bristol, Chicago: Intellect, 2012

Journal: Participations. Journal of Audience & Reception Studies, vol. 10, no. 1, May 2013.

URL: http://www.participations.org/Volume%2010/Issue%201/45%20Jacobs%20Review%2010.1.pdf

Language: English

Cine & Sex. Sessualizzazione dei media e cineromanzo tra gli anni Sessanta e Settanta

Journal: Bianco e Nero. Rivista quadrimestrale del Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia, no. 573, Spring 2013, pp. 61-71

Special Issue: Nuove tendenze della ricerca sul cinema in Italia (edited by Maria Pia Comand)

URL: http://www.carocci.it/index.php?option=com_carocci&task=schedafascicolo&Itemid=257&id_fascicolo=510

Language: Italian
Abstract:

The “eroticization” of Italian (popular) culture during the late 1960s and early 1970s was to all purposes the perfect social and commercial background for the birth of the sexy cineromanzo, a hybrid cultural product capable of capitalizing on the remarkable success of the male-only-magazine formula (that produced “bestsellers” such as Playmen) as well as on the ever increasing availability of naked actresses or sex scenes provided by countless exploitation movies circulating on the screens worldwide. Magazines such as Cinesex, Cinestop, BigFilm, TopFilm and others, in fact, were essentially characterized by a bizarre mix of “spicy” news from the (cinema) world, sex ads, film reviews, and photo-novels directly taken from Italian and international erotic movies.
As it’s generally acknowledged, the idea of an entertainment magazine exclusively focused on cinema and films was nothing new in Italian history, being movie novelization a distinct feature of the Italian cultural industry since the early decades of the 20th century. In particular, the cineromanzo itself rose during the 1950s as the product of the synergy between films and popular magazines in an integrated media system. During the 1970s, on the contrary, the peculiar (decentralized) position of cinema within the media landscape, as well as the restrictions due to the specific generic features of the films that were transposed in this kind of publications created a sort of “anomaly” in the great tradition of novelizations.
This article takes into account the alliance of the cineromanzo with “male” cinematic genres (horror, war movie, and in particular with the erotic movie) during the 1970s, as well its commercial contiguity with contemporary male magazines, challenging the idea of “decadence” traditionally associated with this specific cultural form.

 

 

Le grandi manovre. Gli anni Settanta preparano il porno” (written with Federico Zecca)

Journal: Bianco e Nero. Rivista quadrimestrale del Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia, no. 572, Fall 2012, pp. 58-69

Special Issue: Passato prossimo. Cinema e media in Italia negli anni Settanta (edited by Claudio Bisoni, Paolo Noto)

URL: http://www.carocci.it/index.php?option=com_carocci&task=schedafascicolo&Itemid=257&id_fascicolo=498

Language: Italian

Abstract:

The 1970s can be understood as an important testing ground for the development of audio-visual pornography in Italy.
On one hand, during this decade the increasing popularity of hard core magazines (like Le Ore, OS and Caballero) has contributed to the growth of a specific cinematic audience with a particular “penchant” for pornography: first of all because these products worked as a sort of “cultural mediation” for Italian consumers, making them aware of what was happening on the screens in other (more liberal) European countries, such as Denmark and France; secondly because they contributed to the “normalization” of hard core images among (potential) movie goers, making them eager to see more (hard core) sex on Italian screens.
On the other hand, during the 1970s, Italian “popular” cinema (as well as art cinema) was characterized by a sexual “escalation” that brought the limits of representation slightly beyond soft core: particularly in the second half of the decade, in fact, directors and technicians (such as Joe D’Amato, Roberto Bianchi Montero and Mario Gariazzo, among others) have been experimenting new modes of representation of sexual acts (i.e. hard-core inserts for soft-core movies and/or out and out “double versions” for different markets) that would have come to full achievement only during the 1980s.
Through a historical survey of Italian hard core magazines and through the analysis of a few controversial movies (such as the Black Emanuelle series), this article describes the process through which some peculiar characteristics of Italian “erotic culture” of the 1970s have to some extent prepared the hard-core cinematic production of the following decade, on a “creative” as well as on an industrial level.

 

Concetta e le altre. Il porno siciliano

Journal: Quaderni del C.S.C.I., no. 5, 2009

Special Issue: Idea di un’isola. Viaggio nel cinema della e sulla Sicilia (edited by Emiliano Morreale)

URL: http://amigosdelcsci.blogspot.co.uk

Language: Italian

Description:
Short article on Concetta Licata, Mario Salieri’s pornographic mafia-movie saga (1994).

Pornscapes. Re-enacting Porn Film in the Landscapes of Contemporary Pornography

Journal: Cinéma&Cie. International Film Studies Journal, vol. 9, no. 12, Spring 2009, pp. 127-132

URL: http://www.carocci.it/index.php?option=com_carocci&task=schedafascicolo&Itemid=257&id_fascicolo=369

Language: English

Description: Proceedings of the VII MAGIS – International Film Studies Spring School (27th March-2nd April 2009, DAMS Gorizia, University of Udine).

Emanuelle, l’irriducibile. Le ambiguità dello sguardo nell’erotico italiano degli anni Settanta

Journal: Comunicazioni Sociali, no. 2, May-August 2007, pp. 261-265.

Special issue: Genere e Generi. Figure femminili nell’immaginario cinematografico italiano (edited by Lucia Cardone, Mariagrazia Fanchi)

URL: http://www.vponline.it/riviste/comunicazionisociali/2007/02/

Language: Italian

Abstract:

In this article I wrote for a special issue on gender and genre in Italian cinema of the academic journal Comunicazioni Sociali, I have examined the Black Emanuelle film series, one of the most successful outcomes of Italian soft-core exploitation of the 1970s – even though today it’s well acknowledged that hard-core versions of each title have circulated in the international market. The series has been inaugurated by Albert Thomas/Adalberto Albertini – who only directed the first “official” film in 1975 and then went on with one apocryphal sequel in 1976 –, and has been carried out by Joe D’Amato/Aristide Massaccesi, Bruno Mattei and Claudio Fragasso. Drawing on the seminal Laura Mulvey’s “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” (in Screen, 1975), I have analysed the narrative and “monstrative” construction of the whole series’ main character – an independent, fearless and sexually emancipated photo reporter, played by the Javanese actress Laura Gemser. After a close reading of the texts, I have stated that Black Emanuelle proves to be, at the same time: an active subject of vision, because she owns the “gaze” we spectators must identify with during the most dramatic sequences; a perfect “hero”, who perfectly satisfies our desire for narcissistic projection; and a passive object of the scopophiliac tension of the (male) viewer, with her (naked) body continuously displayed for our erotic solicitation. Such a configuration seems to put into question the traditional opposition between a male-active-subject and a female-passive-object, by creating a sort of masculinised (and thus domesticated) female sexual hero, capable of producing cross-gender identification processes as well as of addressing the (male) spectator with ambiguous and “sexually uneven” boosts.